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Casandra LaTray

Casanda LaTray, left, consults with Public Defender Deirdre Caughlan in District Court in Butte before sentencing Wednesday.

A Butte woman who received a seven-year suspended sentence for pointing a BB gun at three minors in a car is now headed to custody of the Montana Department of Corrections for blowing off probation requirements.

District Judge Robert Whelan agreed with terms in a plea deal and sentenced Casandra LaTray, 27, to seven years in custody of the DOC with two years suspended. He also recommended the DOC place her in a drug-treatment program.

Deirdre Caughlan, LaTray’s public defender, said all of her legal troubles stemmed from an addiction to methamphetamine.

“She is tired of this lifestyle, your Honor,” Caughlan said. “She is motivated for change and is ready to accept the treatment offered.”

LaTray had previously admitted to pulling alongside another car on May 20, 2017 at a stoplight at Harrison and Grand avenues and pointing the gun at three minors. They thought it was a black semi-automatic handgun.

She was later stopped, and police saw a BB gun with a Co2 cartridge sitting on the floor board. She told police “those kids threw something at this car” but denied pointing the gun at them.

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She pleaded guilty to one felony count of assault with a weapon and, in April 2018, then Judge Brad Newman gave her a seven-year suspended sentence.

But probation officers said she violated numerous terms of supervision, including not reporting, changing her residence without permission and not enrolling in certain programs.

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“The defendant has shown complete disregard for the opportunity she was given by the court to remain in the community while on her suspended sentence,” a probation report said. “Her adjustment to supervision has been very poor.”

LaTray apologized to family members in court Wednesday, and Whelan said there was “no question” her troubles were due to addiction.

“The only way to beat it is through a treatment program in custody of the state,” he said.

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