Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
AP

Norway's prime minister on Ukraine: 'The war has to stop'

  • 0

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Norway's prime minister, Jonas Gahr Støre, believes the world — with one notable holdout — is on the same page: “The war has to stop.”

“I heard it from China. I heard it from India. I heard it from African colleagues. And I think that’s an important message because Russia has tried to say ‘No, there are different views,’" Støre told The Associated Press on Thursday, following the morning's U.N. Security Council meeting. “And of course, countries word their opinions in different ways. But in this there has been consistency. The war has to stop.”

As a NATO member whose border with Russia stretches well over 100 miles (just under 200 kilometers), Norway's geographical and geopolitical location has proved relevant in the context of the crisis. It's also an elected member of the Security Council.

Støre had a blunt assessment of the way Russian President Vladimir Putin has tried to justify Russia's actions.

“The narrative of President Putin when he is giving a reason for mobilizing and for continuing the war, I believe that narrative is false. It is not true,” Støre told the AP. “I mean, it’s based on Russia being under threat, pressure, being under some kind of attack by the West. I am a prime minister in a NATO country and bordering Russia, a European country, I belong to the West or whatever you may call it, but this is simply not true.”

Støre does not believe Russia poses a threat to Norway's own territorial integrity, but labeled the aggression “unacceptable.” He also censured Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov's late arrival and early departure from the meeting.

“He chose not to listen to any of the interventions. He spoke and he left after he had spoken, which is, to me, a sign of, in a way, insecurity,” he said.

Since the war's outbreak, Norway has supplanted Russia as Europe's biggest supplier of natural gas. Norway has thus far resisted the European Union's demand for gas price caps, with Støre telling the AP that the limits “would not resolve the fundamental issue, which is that there is a shortage of gas.”

Støre is a proponent of renewable energy sources, particularly offshore wind farms, and thinks that the conflict-driven energy crisis might accelerate the shift — “paradoxically, it will help.”

Norway is a founding member of NATO and within the Schengen Area, but it is not a member of the European Union. While Støre's party supports accession, the prospect has long been unpalatable to the Norwegian populace.

Støre says a “pretty stable majority” prefers the status quo, but he has seen “some” movement in the opinion polls. Pointing to Sweden and Finland's recent shift in policy, he said that the war has instead highlighted the importance of NATO.

However, any decision on further sanctions of Russia would be taken in conjunction with Europe, Støre said.

The war and preceding tensions have absorbed much of Norway's two-year term on the Security Council, but Støre — a former foreign minister — said he's proud of the role his diplomats have played in trying to resolve other quagmires, including returning a U.N. presence to Afghanistan and access to humanitarian aid in Syria.

“We have been able to be a kind of go-between. When the major powers have deep divergences, we can play that role. And I think we have done that in a way which we can look back at it with some satisfaction,” he said. “There are still a few months left and we will be active until the last day.”


For more AP coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/united-nations-general-assembly

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0 Comments
0
0
0
0
0

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

The tide of international opinion appears to have decisively shifted against Russia, as a number of non-aligned countries joined the United States and its allies in condemning Russia’s war in Ukraine and its threats to the principles of the international rules-based order. In what many believed earlier this year was Western wishful thinking, much of the international community spoke out against the conflict in rare displays of unity at the often fractured United Nations. The coalescing condemnation picked up steam when Russian President Vladimir Putin announced the mobilization of an additional 300,000 troops to Ukraine, signaling the unlikelihood of a quick end to the war and suggested nuclear weapons may be an option.

President Joe Biden says the discovery of top-secret documents at former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate raised concerns that sensitive data was compromised and calls it “irresponsible.” In an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes” that aired Sunday, Biden says he has not asked for any specifics “because I don’t want to get myself in the middle of whether or not the Justice Department should move or not move on certain actions they could take.” The FBI served a court-authorized search warrant at Trump's Florida home on Aug. 8. Agents took about 11,000 documents, including roughly 100 with classification markings found in a storage room and an office.

There are few places in the U.S. with a more deeply ingrained reputation as a refuge for immigrants than New York City. But for Mayor Eric Adams, reconciling that image with an influx of migrants sent to the city as part of a political tactic from several Republican governors is proving difficult. Adams says the city is struggling to accommodate asylum seekers, leading him to explore whether New York can ease its practices for sheltering the homeless or even temporarily house migrants on cruise ships. He is one of several leaders of Democratic-leaning jurisdictions facing a sudden test of their commitment to being “sanctuary” cities or states.

Near-final results show a party with neo-fascist roots, the Brothers of Italy, has swept Italy’s national elections. The victory looks set to deliver the first far-right-led government since World War II and make its leader, Giorgia Meloni, the first woman to become Italy’s premier. The country's right-wing lurch immediately shifted Europe’s geopolitical reality, placing a euroskeptic party in position to lead a founding member of the European Union and its third-largest economy. Europe’s right-wing party leaders immediately hailed Meloni’s victory and her party’s meteoric rise as sending a historic message to Brussels. Near-final results showed Meloni’s center-right coalition netting some 44% of the parliamentary vote. Turnout was a historic low 64%.

A federal appeals court is allowing the Justice Department to resume its use of classified records seized from Donald Trump’s Florida estate in its ongoing criminal investigation. The ruling Wednesday clears the way for investigators to continue scrutinizing the documents as they evaluate whether to bring criminal charges over the storage of top-secret government records at Mar-a-Lago. The appeals court note that Trump presented no evidence that he had declassified the records. Trump claimed in a Fox News Interview Wednesday that “If you’re the president of the United States, you can declassify" material just by saying “It’s declassified” and "even by thinking about it."

The independent arbiter tasked with inspecting documents seized in an FBI search of former President Donald Trump’s Florida home says he intends to push briskly through the review process. Raymond Dearie, the veteran Brooklyn-based judge, also appeared skeptical of the Trump team’s reluctance to say whether it believed the records had been declassified. The purpose of Tuesday's meeting was to sort out next steps in a review process expected to slow by weeks, if not months, the criminal investigation into the retention of top-secret information at Mar-a-Lago after Trump left the White House.

Russia has told the world that it has “no choice” but to take military action in Ukraine. After days of denunciations of Russia at the prominent diplomatic gathering, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov sought to shift the focus to Washington. His speech centered on a claim that the United States and its allies are aggressively undermining the international system that the U.N. represents. The West maintains that it's Russia doing that. Invoking history ranging from the U.S. war in Iraq in the early 2000s to the 20th-century Cold War, Lavrov portrayed the U.S. as a bully

An Iowa man has been convicted of charges that he led a crowd of rioters in chasing a U.S. Capitol police officer up a staircase and accosting other officers guarding the Senate. That was one of the most harrowing scenes of the mob’s attack that day. A federal jury deliberated for roughly four hours before convicting Douglas Jensen of felony charges that he obstructed Congress from certifying the Electoral College vote on Jan. 6, 2021, and that he assaulted or interfered with police officers during the siege. Jensen was convicted on all counts, including a charge that he engaged in disorderly conduct inside the Capitol while carrying a folding knife in his pocket.

The CIA has revealed the scale model of the safe house where it found and killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri in Afghanistan. The model is now on display at the CIA Museum, newly refurbished for the agency's 75th anniversary. Intelligence officials used the model to brief President Joe Biden in the White House Situation Room in July. The house shows several balconies, which officials used to show Biden where and how al-Zawahri liked to sit. The museum is not open to the public and generally restricted to agency employees and guests, but it allowed journalists in on Saturday to see its newest exhibits.

A Kremlin-orchestrated referendum got underway in occupied regions of Ukraine that sought to make them part of Russia, with some officials carrying ballots to apartment blocks accompanied by gun-toting police. Kyiv and the West condemned it as a rigged election whose result was preordained by Moscow. The referendums in the Luhansk, Kherson and partly Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia and Donetsk regions were widely seen as a prelude to Moscow annexing the regions. The voting overseen by authorities installed by Russia, scheduled to run through Tuesday, is almost certain to go the Kremlin’s way. Meanwhile, the governor of the Kharkiv region said 436 bodies were exhumed from a mass burial site in the eastern city of Izium, 30 with signs of torture.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News