The three-day conference on restoration that ended Friday at Fairmont Hot Springs Resort was about lessons learned. The Standard asked various attendees what they got out of the symposium.

  • "We all need to be aware of what each other is working on." — Pat Saffel, Missoula, fisheries manager for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks
  • "Everybody needs to be involved in this. Our true heritage is our love of the land, and everybody has to be a part of the restoration of the land." — Bill Callaghan, board member, Butte Natural Resource Damage Restoration Council
  • "This is a long-term dialogue. Every speaker talked about patience and process." — Rayelynn Connole, Butte, program director for Clark Fork Watershed Education Program
  • "I didn't know that much about the restoration of the Clark Fork or the Berkeley Pit. It's great to see what's actually happening. We're starting a project next week on wildlife-friendly fencing, so the lecture on monitoring was really helpful." — Sara Moore, Ennis, Big Sky Watershed Corps volunteer 
  • "I thought it was excellent. We're learning in an incremental way how to be more effective in restoration. We need to plan better, engineer better, social outreach better, better construction process, better monitoring, better education. I see it as an opportunity for improvement in all areas of restoration, and we have time to keep improving the quality of what we're doing." — Will McDowell, Missoula, restoration director for Clark Fork Coalition
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Nat'l Resources / General Reporter

Environmental and natural resources reporter for the Montana Standard.

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